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Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming

Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology (Music/Culture). Paul Theberge

Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology (Music/Culture)


Any.Sound.You.Can.Imagine.Making.Music.Consuming.Technology.Music.Culture..pdf
ISBN: 0819563099,9780819563095 | 303 pages | 8 Mb


Download Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology (Music/Culture)



Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology (Music/Culture) Paul Theberge
Publisher: Wesleyan




I imagine this is how the youngest generation today will feel about how the internet is integrated into our society. We knew that this would happen and of course it's bearing fruit as far as I can see in terms of people's reactions to Rated O, where people say, “God, you can make one single 45 minute album out of this. Making music is pretty much my life, so I can't help but notice and be interested in the evolution of popular music during the last century. I can listen repeatedly, create my own conditions for listening, make quick references to other recordings, no long lines, etc etc etc. Anyway, I think music will, as sampling and wave-editing technology get's better, start to incorporate a wider range of sounds, textures, rhythms, and all the rest. Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music/Consuming Technology. This instrument is given a very bright focus and shows the type of sounds Bob was absorbing at the time, something the film achieves with the usage of archived clips and music from that era that Bob had nothing to do with creating. Instead, music making increasingly employs technology produced elsewhere and is informed by a heightened awareness of sounds that are traveling rapidly around the world. Instruments had to be handmade, guitars made from bamboo with stolen copper wire strings and drums made from cut down trees with calf skin heads, there wasn't a Guitar Center that you could obtain your tools of expression with. There's a little bit of power-tripping in that, maybe, and a little bit of ego, and one of the cool things about where we're at right now with technology and music and intellectual property is that it's a little bit of a wild west moment right now, and nobody really knows what the rules are. There's a tendency for people to sort of assume that the future of culture will be pretty much the same as it is today, but history shows that to be completely false. [Ethnographic evidence] shows that people .. Music can now no longer be adequately modeled as something that happens in a local context and employs only the expressive specific to a locality. When you grow up in a small Midwestern town and become obsessed with music, recordings are largely your only option for musical experiences--not many folks stopped even remotely close to my hometown on tours.